Colts blackout averted. Packer, Bengal fans can watch their teams, too

Colts blackout: The Indianapolis Colts, Cincinnati Bengals, and Green Bay Packers have sold all remaining tickets for their respective NFL playoff home games this weekend. Because there won't be a Colts blackout, football fans in central Indiana will be able to watch the game on TV.

AJ Mast/AP
Colts blackout: Indianapolis Colts' Andrew Luck throws during the first half of an NFL football game against the Jacksonville Jaguars, Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013, in Indianapolis.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET Friday: The Cincinnati Bengals have also sold all remaining tickets for their NFL playoff game this weekend, thereby averting a television blackout in southwest Ohio and northern Kentucky.

 The Indianapolis Colts and Green Bay Packers announced Friday that their weekend playoff games were sellouts, helping them avoid local television blackouts.

The Colts host Kansas City on Saturday and the Packers host San Francisco on Sunday in NFL wild-card games. The Cincinnati Bengals had until late Friday afternoon to sell remaining tickets for Sunday's playoff game against San Diego.

Normally, teams must sell out 72 hours before kickoff to have a game broadcast in the local market. The NFL gave the Colts, Bengals and Packers one more day to do it.

Retailer Meijer bought 1,200 Colts-Chiefs tickets and will distribute them to the Indiana National Guard, Wish For Our Heroes and others. The Packers also sold a number of tickets to corporate interests, including Green Bay-based Associated Bank.

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