Broncos game: Stabbings in stadium parking lot

Broncos game: Stabbings were the result of a fight after a fender bender in the Broncos stadium parking lot after Thursday's game. Three people were injured in the stabbings, none seriously.

Investigators say the stabbing of at least three people in a parking lot at the Denver Broncos' stadium after Thursday night's game stemmed from a fight over a near fender-bender.

Police spokesman Steve Warneke said officers were called to a "very chaotic" scene just before 10 p.m. and found three people suffering from non-life-threatening stab wounds. A fourth may have been stabbed, but that person left the area by the time officers arrived.

Justin Lee Manzanares, 29, is being held for investigation of assault charges, Warneke said. Two others were taken into custody but were released pending further investigation.

"It doesn't appear that this was related to the outcome of the game. It doesn't appear that this was Broncos versus Chargers," Warneke said.

Denver lost to San Diego 27-20.

Police say Manzanares pulled a knife from a sheath he was wearing on his belt and cut or stabbed all three people. They say the fight started after he pulled out of a parking spot and nearly hit the victims' vehicle.

Stadium Management Company, which operates Sports Authority Field at Mile High, issued an email stating that it is working with authorities, and investigators were searching the parking lot Friday for additional evidence.

Thursday's stabbing is just one of several recent attacks at stadiums or involving football fans.

Earlier this month in Kansas City, Mo., a man died after an altercation in the Arrowhead Stadium parking lot during Kansas City's game against Denver.

In September in San Francisco, a teenage fan suffered a concussion and a broken arm and nose at Candlestick Park after police say he was attacked during the 49ers' game against Indianapolis.

Meanwhile in college football, a 28-year-old woman has been charged with murder in a shooting that followed Alabama's loss to Auburn on a dramatic, last-second play during the Iron Bowl in November. The victim's sister says the suspect shot the woman because she was mad at her for joking after the loss and didn't seem to be enough of a Crimson Tide fan.

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