Josh Romney: First responder in Utah car crash

Josh Romney, Mitt Romney's son, helped a family of four out of their car after it crashed in Salt Lake City. Then, Josh Romney tweeted about the rescue.

@joshromney via Twitter
Josh Romney posted this photo of the crash scene and tweeted: "Was first on scene to big accident, see pic of car in the house. I lifted 4 people out to safety. All ok. Thankful."

Josh Romney says he was first on the scene after a vehicle crashed into a house Thanksgiving night in suburban Salt Lake, and he helped four people from the wreckage.

The son former presidential candidate Mitt Romney told the Salt Lake Tribune  that an SUV came "right past our car and into a house."

He said he was on the way home with his wife and children from Thanksgiving dinner with his parents when the car slammed into the kitchen area of the Holladay home.

The paper reports that Romney said in a statement that he "was able to help each of them get out of the car and lift them down to the ground."

"My family and I are grateful that no one was seriously injured and glad to have been able to help those affected by this terrible accident. What I did to help the people involved in the accident is what anyone else would do who witnessed such a potentially dangerous situation."

He also tweeted about the wreck Friday, along with a picture of himself next to the vehicle: "Was first on scene to big accident, see pic of car in the house. I lifted 4 people out to safety. All ok. Thankful."

Unified Police Lt. Justin Hoyal confirmed Romney's presence and said the SUV driver had minor injuries. He said that the home was left "unlivable" but no one inside was hurt.

Reactions on Twitter to Romney's tweet ranged from praise for helping in an emergency to criticism for posing for a photograph at an accident scene.

The Wrap did a point-by-point analysis of what Romney did right and wrong, including:

"It’s always tough to tweet about your accomplishments without looking conceited, which was why the #humblebrag tag was invented," it said. "

Right: Saved four people from a car crash.

Wrong: Posed with the car. That’s weird.

The Wrap concludes: "All in all, great job on the car rescue, so-so job on the tweeting."

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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