Boston Red Sox rolling rally plunges into Charles River

The Boston Red Sox rolled through the city in amphibious 'duck boats' Saturday. Team members stopped and placed the 2013 World Series trophy on the Boston Marathon finish line.  "We played for the whole city," said Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia.

The Boston Red Sox are parading from the Green Monster to the Charles River on Saturday to celebrate a most improbable journey.

The "rolling rally" left Fenway Park three days after the team won the World Series with a 6-1 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 6 at its longtime home. It capped a stunning turnaround from 2012 when the Red Sox had their worst record in nearly half a century.

Players still sporting their beards, manager John Farrell, coaches and team officials boarded 25 amphibious "duck boats" on the warning track.

The vehicles paused when they reached the Boston Marathon finish line, still painted blue and yellow, where three spectators died in the bombings during the April 15 race.

Outfielder Jonny Gomes placed the World Series trophy on the line and he and catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia held Red Sox jerseys with the words "BOSTON STRONG" and the number 617, the city's area code.

Before leaving Fenway, Farrell recalled that the Red Sox had left after their game the day of the Marathon for Logan Airport for a road trip. Along the way, they saw emergency vehicles responding to the explosions.

"Knowing that we were heading out of town, that's going to bring back a lot, and a lot of uncertainty at that moment," Farrell said, "because no one knew where to turn next. So we were fortunate to be part of maybe a little bit of a healing process."

Second baseman Dustin Pedroia said: "We played for the whole city, what the city went through."

On a mild, mostly sunny day, the rally route included a ride in the Charles River between Boston and Cambridge.

Season-ticket holders were allowed into Fenway for a pre-rally ceremony at which team officials, Farrell and several players spoke. Then they all boarded the duck boats.

The departure was delayed when a flatbed truck carrying Dropkick Murphys, a band which had played at the ceremony, and heavy equipment became stuck in the turf along the first-base line.

A duck boat drove up in front of it and, with a tow rope between the vehicles, pulled the flatbed out of the ruts.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.