Two dry ice bombs explode at LAX

Four dry ice bombs were placed in areas of Los Angeles International Airport that are restricted to employees only. One bomb exploded Sunday evening, one bomb exploded Monday evening.

 A second dry ice explosion occurred Monday evening at Los Angeles International Airport, but there were no reports of any injuries or evacuations, authorities said.

The explosion was reported shortly before 8:30 p.m. at the airport's Tom Bradley International Terminal.

Two other devices also were found at the airport but they did not explode, Detective Gus Villanueva said.

Investigators don't believe the incident is linked to terrorism and no threat was called into the airport, Villanueva said.

No flights were affected by the explosion Monday, authorities said.

On Sunday night, someone planted a 20-ounce plastic bottle containing dry ice that exploded in an employee bathroom in LAX's terminal 2. Up to four flights were delayed after airport police halted security screening for more than an hour.

The Los Angeles Times reports that police were investigating how four dry ice bombs were placed in restricted areas at Los Angeles International Airport.

No arrests have been made in either case.

A bomb squad was at the airport late Monday and investigators from the LAPD's criminal conspiracy division were assisting, Villanueva said.

Dry ice bombs are simple devices, made by putting water and dry ice in a container. As the dry ice (the solid form of carbon dioxide) becomes a gas, pressure increases in the bottle until it explodes.  Dry ice bombs are illegal in some states, including California.

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