Bikers attack SUV driver in NYC after accident

Bikers attack SUV: The assault on the man began around 1:30 p.m. Sunday on the West Side Highway after he got into an accident with one of the bikers around 125th Street. After the driver and motorcyclist pulled over, they were quickly surrounded by 20 to 30 bikers who began damaging the victim's Range Rover, police said.

A man driving with his family along a New York City highway was attacked by a group of motorcyclists who chased his SUV for more than 50 blocks after it bumped into one of the bikes, which had stopped suddenly, police said.

The assault on the 33-year-old man began around 1:30 p.m. Sunday on the West Side Highway after he got into an accident with one of the bikers around 125th Street. After the driver and motorcyclist pulled over, they were quickly surrounded by 20 to 30 bikers who began damaging the victim's Range Rover, police said.

The driver, who was traveling with his wife and toddler, struck two other bikers while fleeing, police said. The other bikers gave chase, pursuing him for about 2 1/2 miles, and again surrounded the vehicle. They pulled the man from the SUV and beat him, police said.

The man was taken to a hospital where he required stitches to his face. His wife and child were not injured. The man was not charged.

On Tuesday, police arrested the biker who was involved in the initial accident. Christopher Cruz, 28, was charged with reckless endangerment, reckless driving, endangering the welfare of a child and menacing. He was not injured in the accident.

Police said another biker suffered two broken legs after the SUV ran over him. A second biker suffered a leg injury.

Police believe some of the bikers belong to a gang known as Hollywood Stuntz. They said the motorcyclists were part of a planned but unauthorized event in which hundreds of riders gathered outside of Manhattan, with the intent of driving into Times Square en masse.

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