Alex Rodriguez suspended through 2014 in latest MLB drug probe

New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez was suspended for 211 games, starting this Thursday, for his role in the Biogenesis baseball drug scandal. 12 other players each received 50-game suspensions.

Rich Schultz/AP
New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez stands on first base after drawing a walk during the first inning of a Class AA baseball game with the Trenton Thunder against the Reading Phillies Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, in Trenton, N.J.

Alex Rodriguez was suspended through 2014 and All-Stars Nelson Cruz, Jhonny Peralta and Everth Cabrera were banned 50 games apiece Monday when Major League Baseball disciplined 13 players in a drug case — the most sweeping punishment since the Black Sox scandal nearly a century ago.

Ryan Braun's 65-game suspension last month and previous punishments bring to 18 the total number of players disciplined for their relationship to Biogenesis of America, a closed anti-aging clinic in Florida accused of distributing banned performing-enhancing drugs.

The harshest penalty was reserved for Rodriguez, a three-time Most Valuable Player and baseball's highest-paid star. His suspension covers 211 games, starting Thursday, and he is expected to appeal. "A-Rod" will be eligible to play for the Yankees while he waits for the appeal process.

The New York Yankees slugger admitted four years ago that he used performance-enhancing drugs while with Texas from 2001-03 but has repeatedly denied using them since.

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