Howard's Rock at Clemson University vandalized

Howard's Rock is a talisman that sits inside Clemson Memorial Stadium. Howard's Rock is touched by Clemson Tiger football players as they enter the stadium before every home game.

Mark Crammer, Anderson Independent-Mail/AP
Over 30,000 Clemson fans filled Memorial Stadium, where Howard's Rock is located, for the Tigers' NCAA college football Orange - White spring scrimmage on Saturday, April 13, 2013 in Clemson, S.C.

Clemson University officials say that the famed Howard's Rock at Memorial Stadium has been vandalized.

Football players touch the rock before they run down the hill during the team's entrance into "Death Valley" stadium.

A university statement says the rock was vandalized sometime June 2 or 3. Police are investigating.

The statement says a small part of the rock was broken off of its pedestal after vandals broke the casing that protects it.

Athletics Director Dan Radakovich says the incident is being taken very seriously because the rock is an important part of the school's history.

The rock is dubbed "Howard's Rock" because former football coach Frank Howard began the tradition of the pre-game ritual.

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