N.C. motel deaths under investigation, three die in hotel room within months

N.C. motel deaths: Police in Boone said Sunday that Jeffrey Lee Williams of Rock Hill, S.C., is dead. His 49-year-old mother Jeannie Williams was injured. Police Sgt. Shane Robbins did not describe her injuries or condition.

North Carolina police are investigating why an 11-year-old South Carolina boy died and his mother was injured in the same motel room where two elderly guests were found dead almost two months ago.

Police in Boone said Sunday that Jeffrey Lee Williams of Rock Hill, S.C., is dead. His 49-year-old mother Jeannie Williams was injured. Police Sgt. Shane Robbins did not describe her injuries or condition.

Robbins says detectives are testing possible evidence related to the dead boy found Saturday as well as features of the room at the Best Western Plus Blue Ridge Plaza. Robbins says investigators have determined there is no danger to the general public but did not elaborate.

Police say no evidence has surfaced linking the Williamses and the two victims found April 16.

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