Had your winter Phil? Check Groundhog Day forecast

With thousands watching on Gobbler's Knob in west-central Pennsylvania, Punxsutawney Phil emerged from his lair Saturday but didn't see his shadow.

Gene J. Puskar/AP
In this Feb. 2, 2012 file photo, Groundhog Club handler Ron Ploucha holds Punxsutawney Phil, the weather prognosticating groundhog, on Gobbler's Knob in Punxsutawney, Pa. Legend has it that if the groundhog sees his shadow on Feb. 2, winter will last six more weeks. No shadow means an early spring.

Punxsutawney's famous groundhog predicts spring will come early this year.

With thousands watching on Gobbler's Knob in west-central Pennsylvania, Punxsutawney Phil emerged from his lair Saturday but didn't see his shadow.

Legend has it that if the furry rodent sees his shadow on Feb. 2, winter will last six more weeks. But if he doesn't see his shadow, spring will come early.

The prediction is made during a ceremony overseen by a group called the Inner Circle. Members don top hats and tuxedos for the ceremony on Groundhog Day each year.

Bill Deeley, president of the Inner Circle, says that after "consulting" with Phil, he makes the call in deciphering what the world's Punxsutawney Phil has to say about the weather.

Phil is known as the "seer of seers" and "sage of sages." Organizers predicted about 20,000 people this weekend, a larger-than-normal crowd because Groundhog Day falls on a weekend this year.

Phil's got company in the forecasting department.

There's Staten Island Chuck, in New York; General Beauregard Lee, in Atlanta; and Wiarton Willie, in Wiarton, Ontario, among others noted by the National Climactic Data Center "Groundhog Day" Web page.

"Punxsutawney can't keep something this big to itself," the Data Center said. "Other prognosticating rodents are popping up to claim a piece of the action."

Phil is the original — and the best, Punxsutawney partisans insist.

"We welcome them all. We like the competition," Deeley said this week.

The 1993 movie "Groundhog Day" starring Bill Murray brought even more notoriety to the Pennsylvania party. The record attendance was about 30,000 the year after the movie's release, said Katie Donald, executive director of the Groundhog Club. About 13,000 attend if Feb. 2 falls on a weekday.

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