Carmelo Anthony suspended and fined $176,700

Carmelo Anthony was suspended after attempting to confront Celtics player Kevin Garnett after the New York Knicks loss Monday. Carmelo Anthony was also fined.

(AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
New York Knicks' Carmelo Anthony (7) and Boston Celtics' Kevin Garnett, center, exchange words Monday after both received technical fouls at Madison Square Garden in New York. Anthony said Tuesday, he lost his cool after Garnett said things to him that he feels shouldn't be said to "another man."

 Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony has been suspended one game by the NBA for confronting Kevin Garnett after New York's loss to Boston on Monday.

Anthony, who was angry about Garnett's choice of words during a fourth-quarter altercation, went toward the Celtics' locker room after the game and later waited for Garnett outside Boston's team bus.

Anthony didn't believe he would be suspended because he was just looking to talk to Garnett, not have an altercation.

"It's certain things that you just don't say to men, another man," Anthony said Tuesday. "I felt that he crossed the line. Like I said, we're both at an understanding right now; we handled it the way we handled it. Nobody needs to know what was said behind closed doors. So that situation is handled."

‘‘It’s over with for me. Whatever happened last night, happened. The words that was being said between me and Garnett, it happened, can’t take that away,’’ Anthony said. ‘‘I lost my cool yesterday, I accept that, but there’s just certain things that push certain people’s buttons.’’

But NBA executive vice president of operations Stu Jackson said in a statement Wednesday "There are no circumstances in which it is acceptable for a player to confront an opponent after a game. Carmelo Anthony attempted to engage with Kevin Garnett multiple times after Monday's game and therefore a suspension was warranted."

Anthony will miss the Knicks' nationally televised game at Indiana on Thursday and lose about $176,700 of his $19.4 million salary.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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