Calif. high school shooting leaves one injured, one in custody

The shooting occurred about 9 a.m. at Taft Union High School, in community of fewer than 10,000 people amidst oil and natural gas production fields in San Joaquin Valley, northwest of Los Angeles.

Michael Long/The Taft Independent/Reuters
Law enforcement officers wearing FBI vests arrive on the scene after a shooting at Taft Union High School in Taft, California January 10. Gunfire erupted on Thursday at a California high school in inland Kern County.

A student was shot and wounded at a rural high school Thursday and another student was taken into custody, officials said.

The shooting occurred about 9 a.m. at Taft Union High School, in community of fewer than 10,000 people amidst oil and natural gas production fields in San Joaquin Valley, about 120 miles (193 kilometers) northwest of Los Angeles.

The student who was shot was flown to a hospital in Bakersfield, said Ray Pruitt, spokesman for the Kern County Sheriff's Department. There was no immediate word on the victim's condition.

Pruitt said the suspect is a student, and a shotgun was used in the attack.

Kern County Fire Department Eric Coughran told KBAK-TV that another person suffered some type of injuries in the incident but refused medical attention.

KERO-TV Bakersfield reported that the station received phone calls from people inside the school who hid in closets.

It was not immediately clear how many students are enrolled at the high school.

The Taft shooting came less than a month after a gunman massacred 20 children and six women at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, then killed himself.

That shooting prompted President Barack Obama to promise new efforts to curb gun violence. Vice President Joe Biden, who was placed in charge of the initiative, said Tuesday in Washington that he would deliver new policy proposals to the president by next week.

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