Boehner: 'Obamacare is the law of the land'

In an interview with ABC, Republican Representative John Boehner suggested he will not prioritize the repeal of the healthcare law to the extent that he has in the past. But following the interview, a spokesman for Boehner said repealing the law 'would be on the table.' 

Charles Dharapak/AP/File
In this file photo, President Obama reaches for a pen to sign the health-care bill in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Obama's reelection has guaranteed the survival of his health-care law.

Top Republican lawmaker John Boehner said on Thursday he would not make it his mission to repeal the Obama administration's healthcare reform law following the re-election of President Barack Obama.

"The election changes that," Boehner, speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, told ABC news anchor Diane Sawyer when asked if repealing the law was "still your mission."

"It's pretty clear that the president was re-elected ," Boehner added. "Obamacare is the law of the land."

Under Boehner's leadership, the House tried repeatedly to repeal the healthcare law, the signature domestic measure of Obama's first term. While a few provisions were eliminated or changed, Senate Democrats blocked outright termination of the law.

Boehner added that parts of the law were going to be difficult to implement and that everything had to be on the table as lawmakers try to create a path to a balanced budget.

A spokesman for Boehner said later the speaker and House Republicans "remain committed to repealing the law, and he said in the interview it would be on the table."

The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the biggest overhaul of the $2.8 trillion U.S. healthcare system since the 1960s, aims to extend health coverage to more than 30 million uninsured Americans beginning in January 2014.

The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the reforms in a landmark June ruling.

Defeated Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney had vowed to repeal the law if he were elected.

In Tuesday's election, Republicans kept their majority in the House and Democrats maintained control of the Senate.

In the ABC interview, Boehner also said a comprehensive approach to immigration reform was needed and he was confident that Republicans could find common ground with Obama on the issue.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.