Colleen LaRose ('Jihad Jane') faces life in prison in December sentencing

Colleen LaRose called herself 'Jihad Jane.' She admitted she plotted to kill a Swedish artist who offended Muslims. Colleen LaRose's sentencing was delayed until December.

AP Photo/SITE Intelligence Group
Colleen LaRose, an American woman from Pennsylvania, admitted to using the Internet to recruit jihadist fighters and help terrorists overseas. She called herself Jihad Jane and Fatima LaRose online.

A Pennsylvania woman who called herself Jihad Jane and admitted she plotted to kill a Swedish artist who offended Muslims faces a life sentence in December.

Pennsburg resident Colleen LaRose has been in custody since she returned from Ireland to surrender to the FBI in 2009.

Her arrest was kept secret until several other people were rounded up months later. A Maryland teenager has been charged.

Court papers show the 48-year-old LaRose called herself Jihad Jane in an online video and said she was "desperate" to help Muslims.

LaRose pleaded guilty to conspiracy to murder a foreign target and support terrorists and lying to the FBI. The murder plot wasn't carried out.

Prosecutors said Monday LaRose's sentencing will be Dec. 19 in Philadelphia. Sentencing had been set for this month.

LaRose's lawyer hasn't returned a message seeking comment.

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Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

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