Beyonce reportedly signed on for Super Bowl halftime show

A source familiar with the Super Bowl told The Associated Press the Grammy-winning diva will take the stage at the halftime show on Feb. 3, 2013, at the Superdome in New Orleans.

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Beyonce performs at New York's Roseland Ballroom in August.

All the single ladies will be watching the upcoming Super Bowl along with football lovers. That's because Beyonce is the halftime show performer.

A source familiar with the Super Bowl told The Associated Press the Grammy-winning diva will take the stage at the halftime show on Feb. 3, 2013, at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans. The source spoke on condition of anonymity because that person wasn't authorized to publicly reveal the information.

The official announcement is expected Wednesday, the source said.

Beyonce, whose pop and R&B hits include "Crazy in Love," ''Irreplaceable" and "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)," has won 16 Grammy Awards. The 31-year-old sang the national anthem at the 2004 Super Bowl in her hometown of Houston when the New England Patriots defeated the Carolina Panthers.

Madonna performed at halftime at this year's Super Bowl in February with guests CeeLo Green, Nicki Minaj, LMFAO and M.I.A. The New York Giants beat the New England Patriots in a thrilling rematch of the contest four years earlier. Her performance was seen by 114 million people, a higher average than the game itself, which was seen by an estimated 111.3 million people, according to the Nielsen Co.

If Beyonce's performance at the Pepsi NFL Halftime Show features collaborations, it could likely include husband-rapper Jay-Z and her Destiny's Child bandmates Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams.

New Orleans last hosted a Super Bowl in 2002, making next year's game the first NFL championship in the city since Hurricane Katrina devastated parts of the Louisiana Superdome in 2005. Pepsi is returning as the sponsor for the halftime show since doing so in 2007 when Prince performed.

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