Romney denies criticism of Palestinian culture at Israel fundraiser

Palestinian officials accused Romney of racism for suggesting that culture helps explain the economic disparity between Israelis and Palestinians.

Kacper Pempel/Reuters
US Republican Presidential candidate Mitt Romney delivers foreign policy remarks at the University of Warsaw Library in Warsaw, on July 31.

Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney says he wasn't criticizing Palestinianculture at a fundraiser in Jerusalem on Monday.

Palestinian officials accused Romney of racism for suggesting that culture helps explain the economic disparity between Israelis and Palestinians. He did not mention the harsh restrictions Israel places on the Palestinians.

On Tuesday, Romney told Fox News that he wasn't specifically talking about Palestinian culture.

He's downplaying a series of perceived missteps on his three-country overseas trip and blaming the media.Romney says reporters are more interested in "finding something to write" than about reporting on the economy and national security threats.

Romney also prompted angry headlines across Britain last week when he questioned London's readiness for the Olympics.

He says the media is trying to "divert from the fact that these last four years have been tough years for our country."

Romney is on his way back from Poland.

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