George Zimmerman had two black eyes, broken nose, medical report says

George Zimmerman was examined by his family doctor the day after he fatally shot Trayvon Martin, according to ABC News. The medical report provides the details of George Zimmerman's injuries.

AP Photo/Orlando Sentinel, Gary W. Green, Pool, File
George Zimmerman appears at a bond hearing in Sanford, Fla., last month. Zimmerman saw a doctor the day after his encounter with Trayvon Zimmerman.

Court records show George Zimmerman had a pair of black eyes, a nose fracture and two cuts to the back of his head after the fatal shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

ABC News obtained the medical reports from Zimmerman's family physician. But ABC News reports that the medical records are part of evidence released Tuesday that prosecutors have in the second-degree murder case against Zimmerman. He has entered a plea of not guilty and claims self-defense in the Feb. 26 shooting. A message left Tuesday evening with Zimmerman's attorney was not immediately returned.

Zimmerman was treated Feb. 27. A phone call made Tuesday evening to the clinic rang unanswered.

ABC says: "The morning after the shooting, on Feb. 27, Zimmerman sought treatment at the offices of a general physician at a family practice near Sanford, Fla. The doctor notes Zimmerman sought an appointment to get legal clearance to return to work."

ABC News first reported Zimmerman's injuries from the medical records. Some of the injuries were previously reported by The Associated Press based on video of Zimmerman at a local jail.

As the Christian Science Monitor reported Tuesday, prosecutors in the Trayvon Martin shooting began to sketch an outline of their case against George Zimmerman on Monday, citing new video evidence, a long list of witnesses and experts, and hints of a trail of facts, forensic details, and witness observations that they hope will lead a jury to a second-degree murder conviction.

But after weeks of national introspection into what really happened between Mr. Martin, an unarmed black teen, the guts of the hefty Zimmerman file remain secret. The prosecution, for its part, wants to keep it that way, having asked Judge Kenneth Lester to waive Florida court transparency laws in order to keep some witness names secret.

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