Rick Santorum gains in N.H., but Mitt Romney still leads, says new poll

Rick Santorum rose to 11 percent, but still trails Ron Paul and Mitt Romney, says a new 7 News/Suffolk University poll.

AP Photo/Elise Amendola
Narrowing the gap: Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum speaks in Northfield, N.H. Thursday, Jan. 5, 2012.

 Fresh from his strong showing in Iowa, Republican U.S. presidential candidate Rick Santorum has picked up support in New Hampshire ahead of its primary next week, but rival Mitt Romney holds a sizeable lead, according to a poll released on Friday.

Santorum, a former U.S. senator from Pennsylvania, had 11 percent support, up from 8 percent, among likely voters in New Hampshire's primary, according to a 7 News/Suffolk University tracking poll conducted on Wednesday and Thursday.

New Hampshire's primary on Tuesday will be the second in a series of voting contests to choose a Republican nominee to face Democratic President Barack Obama in November's election.

RECOMMENDED: 9 things to know about Rick Santorum

Since finishing narrowly behind Romney at the Iowa caucuses on Tuesday, Santorum has moved ahead of Newt Gingrich, former U.S. House of Representatives speaker, and former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman in the New Hampshire survey.

Romney, the former governor of neighboring Massachusetts, had 40 percent support, down from 41 percent a day earlier. Support for Texas Congressman Ron Paul slipped to 17 percent from 18 percent.

Gingrich's support rose to 9 percent from 7 percent. Huntsman, who was endorsed over Romney by the Boston Globe newspaper on Thursday, had 8 percent support against 7 percent. One percent of voters backed Texas Governor Rick Perry, and 15 percent of voters were still undecided.

The poll is based on phone interviews of 500 likely voters in the Republican primary and has a margin of error of 4.4 percentage points.

Another New Hampshire opinion survey, conducted on Wednesday, showed a Santorum bounce and a tighter race overall in New Hampshire.

The Washington Times/JZ Analytics Poll of almost 500 voters put Romney ahead with 38 percent, followed by Paul at 24 percent and Santorum at 11 percent. Ten percent of voters were undecided.

The survey had a margin of error of 4.5 percentage points.

( Editing by Vicki Allen)

RECOMMENDED: 9 things to know about Rick Santorum

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.