Rep. Scalise shot at congressional baseball practice

House majority whip Steve Scalise was shot while on second base during a congressional baseball practice Wednesday morning. He remains in stable condition at George Washington University Hospital.

Joshua Roberts/Reuters/File
House majority whip Steve Scalise (R) of Louisiana (l.) talks with Rep. Peter Welch (D) of Vermont on Capitol Hill in Washington on March 8, 2017. Representative Scalise was shot Wednesday, June 14, 2017, during a congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Va., and is said to be in stable condition.

A top House Republican, Steve Scalise of Louisiana, was shot Wednesday at a congressional baseball practice just outside of Washington, officials said. Several other people were also believed to have been hit, according to a lawmaker who witnessed the shooting.

Representative Scalise, the House majority whip, was in stable condition at George Washington University Hospital, according to one congressional aide. His injuries were not believed to be life-threatening.

President Trump said he was "deeply saddened by this tragedy" and was monitoring developments.

The shooting occurred at a baseball field in Alexandria, Va., where lawmakers and others were gathered for a morning practice. Alexandria police said a suspect was taken into custody and "not a threat."

Rep. Mike Bishop (R) of Michigan said Scalise was at second base when he was shot.

"I was looking right at him," Representative Bishop told Detroit radio station WWJ. "He was a sitting duck."

Rep. Mo Brooks (R) of Alabama said two law enforcement officers were believed to be among the others shot.

Representative Brooks said that Scalise was down on the ground with what Brooks described as "a hip wound." 

"We started giving him the liquids, I put pressure on his wound in his hip," Brooks said.

House Speaker Paul Ryan's office said Scalise's wounds were not believed to be life-threatening and that a member of the security detail was also shot.

Scalise is the No. 3 House Republican leader. He was first elected to the House in 2008 after serving in the state legislature.

Katie Filous was walking her two dogs near the field when she heard "a lot of shots, probably more than 20." She said the shooting "went on for quite a while."

Ms. Filous said she saw the shooter hit a uniformed law enforcement officer, who she said was later evacuated by helicopter. She said the officer had gotten out of a parked car, drawn a handgun, and shouted something to the gunman, who then fired.

Rep. Jeff Duncan (R) of South Carolina said in a statement that he was at the practice and "saw the shooter."

"Please pray for my colleagues," Representative Duncan said.

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