Kenya's Stanley Biwott, Mary Keitany win at New York City Marathon

Kenya's Stanley Biwott and Mary Keitany emerged victorious at the New York City Marathon on Sunday.

Seth Wenig/AP
Stanley Biwott of Kenya, left, crosses the finish line first in the men's division at the 2015 New York City Marathon in New York, Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015. Biwott and Mary Keitany swept the titles at the New York City Marathon.

Kenya's Stanley Biwott and Mary Keitany swept the titles at the New York City Marathon on Sunday.

Keitany became the first woman to repeat since Paula Radcliffe in 2008.

Biwott won his first major marathon title after placing second in London last year. He finished in 2 hours, 10 minutes, 34 seconds, beating countryman Geoffrey Kamworor by 14 seconds. Reigning Boston Marathon winner Lelisa Desisa was third and defending champion was Wilson Kipsang fourth.

Keitany finished in 2:24:25, beating Ethiopia's Aselefech Mergia by 67 seconds for the largest margin of victory since Radcliffe's 2008 title. She pulled away around the 21-mile mark to become the eighth woman to win more than once in New York. Ethiopia's Tigist Tufa took third.

Keitany, a two-time London Marathon champ, had twice finished third in New York before breaking through last year when she won by just 3 seconds. That was her first marathon since 2012 because of the birth of her second child.

Mergia is also coming back from a long break. Her daughter was born in July 2013 and she didn't run another marathon until winning in Dubai in January.

Laura Thweatt of the U.S. was seventh in her marathon debut. In the men's race, 40-year-old American Meb Keflezighi, the 2009 champ, was also seventh.

More than 50,000 runners are expected to finish the 45th running of NYC Marathon, completing the 26.2 miles through the five boroughs.

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