Wojciech Braszczok: Undercover NYC cop found guilty in biker melee

Wojciech Braszczok: A September 2013 biker rally turned violent on Manhattan's West Side Highway. An undercover detective for the New York Police Department was among eleven to plead guilty to lesser charges like second-degree assault, coercion, and riot.

Seth Wenig/AP
Wojciech Braszczok, center, is led into the courtroom on Feb. 27, 2014 while covering his face in New York. Alexian Lien, an SUV driver who was beaten bloody by a group of angry motorcyclists after he’d run a biker over wept as he testified Monday, May 18, 2015, that he was scared to death during the melee. Lien was testifying at the trial of undercover detective Braszczok and co-defendant Robert Sims, who are charged with assault and other crimes following a motorcycle rally that devolved into pandemonium and became a highway horror story to millions who saw a helmet-camera video posted online.

An undercover New York Police Department detective was acquitted Tuesday of the most serious charges but convicted of lesser crimes for his role in a highway melee in which motorcyclists pulled an SUV driver out his window and pummeled him in front of his wife and toddler.

Detective Wojciech Braszczok and his co-defendant, Robert Sims, had said they believed the driver was fleeing the scene of a crime because he had just struck a biker amid the September 2013 rally. But a judge, not a jury, found them not guilty of the top charges of gang assault and first-degree assault but guilty of crimes including second-degree assault, coercion and riot. Sims was also convicted of attempted gang assault and attempted first-degree assault.

"The verdict was based on the law and evidence and nothing but the law and the evidence," Judge Maxwell Wiley said. "I'm sure that it will be noted that the court arrived at different verdicts between the defendants. This difference was based solely on the court's evaluation of the evidence."

Braszczok and Sims had faced up to 25 years if convicted of the top charges. They now face significantly less time.

Eleven men were indicted in the confrontation, which occurred on Manhattan's West Side Highway. The others pleaded guilty to lesser crimes.

On the witness stand, SUV driver Alexian Lien said he and his family were headed to New Jersey for some shopping for the couple's anniversary. But when they hit the highway in their blue Range Rover, they crossed paths with hundreds of bikers. Some were popping wheelies and slapping the tops of cars they passed.

One motorcyclist tried to block other cars from going north to allow the bikes to pass, but Lien said he was "annoyed" and wanted to get on with his day, so he kept driving. As the bikes whizzed by, his wife tossed a half-eaten plum and later a water bottle at the bikers, he said.

Tensions rose. A motorcyclist knocked off his rearview mirror, and Lien was eventually forced to stop as some bikers got off their rides and approached his car. He said he could feel it being hit and kicked.

"I'm horrified at this point, and I recall asking my wife, 'What do I do? What do I do?'" Lien recounted through tears. "She says, 'Just go! Just go!'"

"And I make a hard right because I see there's an opening and I ... I just go."

He said he knew he had hit someone. "But I just wanted to escape the situation," he said.

Bikers followed him off the highway, eventually pulling him from the SUV and attacking him in front of his wife and daughter. Lien needed at least 20 stitches on his face and was not charged. The biker Lien hit, Edwin Mieses, was paralyzed.

Braszczok testified that he followed Lien because he wanted to "stop the car from running more people over." When he got off his bike, he intended to tell Lien to stop driving, but he heard a bang and saw the SUV window break, and then started to fear for his safety, so he left.

"I should have called 911, but I didn't," he said. He said he regretted the decision, adding he believed the police were on their way. He still faces a possible departmental trial and firing from the job for not calling police and for initially lying to his superiors about his involvement in the case.

Sims did not testify.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.