Boston breaks snow record. More to come?

With 2.9 inches Sunday, Boston hit 108.6 inches for the season, topping a record of 107.6 inches set in 1995-96, according to the National Weather Service in Taunton. The weather service noted that more snow is possible.

Boston finally has its snow record, and it could get more.

With 2.9 inches Sunday, Logan International Airport hit 108.6 inches for the season, topping a record of 107.6 inches set in 1995-96, according to the National Weather Service in Taunton.

The weather service noted that more snow is possible.

Computer models indicate a coastal storm could develop Friday, but they differ on its track. The storm could bring little to no precipitation to southern New England, or it could bring "a decent slug" of rain and snow to the region, the forecasters said Monday morning.

Residents have had mixed feelings about the record, with some rooting for it.

"Boston has a rich tradition of leading the nation in the pursuit of liberty, freedom, sports titles and snowplows," said Bruce Mendelsohn, a Cambridge public relations executive.

Justin O'Brien, a Boston attorney, joked: "Is this the part where we all get to say 'I'm going to Disney World?'"

On Twitter, the mayor and residents celebrated the dubious distinction.

Sunday's snow came after a record-setting monthly snowfall of 64.9 inches in February. The worst previous single month was January 2005 when 43.3 inches fell.

The season snowfall record is measured from July 1 through June 30. Records go back to 1872.

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