Malin Akerman discusses her new TV comedy 'Trophy Wife'

Malin Akerman portrays the new wife of a twice-divorced father (Bradley Whitford) on the ABC comedy. Malin Akerman has previously appeared in films such as 'Couples Retreat' and '27 Dresses.'

Peter 'Hopper' Stone/ABC/AP
Malin Akerman (r.) stars on 'Trophy Wife.'

After roles in films including "27 Dresses," ''Couples Retreat" and "Wanderlust," Malin Akerman is bringing her comedic chops to network TV with the sitcom "Trophy Wife."

The show, airing Tuesdays at 9:30 p.m. Eastern on ABC, stars Akerman as Kate, a woman newly married to an older man (played by Bradley Whitford) who is twice divorced with three kids. It also stars Marcia Gay Harden and Michaela Watkins as the ex-wives.

In a recent interview, Akerman explained the title is tongue-in-cheek.

"From an outsider's point of view, people go: 'Oh, younger, cute woman with an older man. Of course she's a trophy wife.' But we learn that Kate is really this lovely woman who is in it for the right reasons. Loves the kids, loves her husband, but just isn't really good at it yet," she said with a laugh.

The 35-year-old actress is a new mother in real life, too. She gave birth to a son named Sebastian in April. Akerman says that shortly after she accepted the "Trophy Wife" role, she learned she was pregnant and that "it was kind of perfect timing."

Her busy film schedule is what made her interested in taking on TV full-time.

"To be honest with you, I'd been doing film for a while, which I love... but I got to a certain point where there was one year where I was home maybe three months out of the whole year and I was like: 'You know what? I would love to just be home, be with my husband, be with my friends and just kind of have more of a regular schedule.'"

She gravitated toward comedy because she has always appreciated it and had a knack for it.

"Silliness has always been in my life," she says. "Both my parents are just silly and sarcastic, and so I think that it kind of stemmed from that, and I've been embarrassed so much in my life by my own parents that it's like... nothing embarrasses me anymore."

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