'Mad Men' final season will air in two parts in 2014 and 2015

The 'Mad Men' final season will be split over two years, according to the show's network AMC. The 'Mad Men' final season will have an additional episode, bringing the total to 14 rather than the usual 13.

Michael Yarish/AMC/AP
The 'Mad Men' final season will star Jon Hamm (l.) and Megan Paré.

AMC is keeping "Mad Men" around an extra year, expanding the final season of this acclaimed drama series to 14 episodes and portioning them equally in 2014 and 2015.

The network said Tuesday that seven episodes will air next spring and another seven in 2015. Previous "Mad Men" seasons have spanned 13 episodes.

Series creator Matthew Weiner said the two-part season will enable "a more elaborate story" to be told.

The arrangement mirrors that of another AMC series, "Breaking Bad," whose final season, now nearing its end, was similarly split in two.

"Mad Men," which premiered in 2007, has won four Emmy awards for outstanding drama series. It heads into Sunday's awards night with four major Emmy nominations, including best actor for Jon Hamm, who has never won.

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