Justin Timberlake, Katy Perry will perform at the American Music Awards

Justin Timberlake, Miley Cyrus, and other artists will perform at the AMAs on Nov. 24. Macklemore & Ryan Lewis secured the most nominations, with Justin Timberlake and Taylor Swift close behind.

Todd Williamson/Invision/AP
Justin Timberlake performs at the Palladium in Los Angeles.

Katy Perry is on a four-week journey that snakes around the world, including stops in Amsterdam, Australia and Japan. She's got Germany to go before crossing the Atlantic Ocean to Miami. And then it's across the continent to Los Angeles.

"I am probably not going to be able to tell you what day of the week it is or what time it is because I will have lived in so many different time zones," Perry said.

She's got one date memorized: Nov. 24. That's when the 29-year-old pop star will open the American Music Awards with her new single, "Unconditionally." Jennifer Lopez will also appear in tribute to Celia Cruz and TLC. Perry said in a phone interview she plans to step it up in what she believes is her first chance to open an awards show.

"You take that into consideration, that you are kind of like setting the tone for everyone in the evening, so you always bring out the big guns in the beginning," Perry said, later adding: "I always seem to be flying in on something or coming out of something. I like to entertain the kids, I really do."

Perry, Lopez and TLC, which will feature an unannounced guest, will be joined in performance by many of the year's top stars, including Justin Timberlake, Lady Gaga, Miley Cyrus, Luke Bryan and One Direction. Pitbull will host the show, which will air live from Los Angeles on ABC.

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