Kellie Pickler: Why she's an outstanding country artist

Kellie Pickler just released a new album, "The Woman I Am." A former American Idol contestant, Kellie Pickler is now maturing into a top-class country singer.

E!
Kellie Pickler on E! discusses her new album.

Kellie Picker, on her new album "The Woman I Am," merges the tradition-minded sound of her previous album with contemporary country touches in a manner that proves how well the two can blend and still speak to the modern world.

Continuing to mature into a top-class country singer, the former "American Idol" competitor has grown from a competent interpreter of others' songs into an artist with her own vision and style. As a songwriter and vocalist, she's held onto the charm of her back-country personality while growing into a confident stylist who can adapt to the glossy entertainment world that sometimes has tried to push her aside.

The title song references Patsy Cline as a salve for difficult nights, then cites all the personal weaknesses, quirks and strengths that make her who she is. She leans on current themes in country music in "Closer To Nowhere," about drinking with a friend and disappearing into a rural hideout, but makes it believable.

She's at her best on sensitive ballads ("Tough All Over," ''Someone Somewhere Tonight," ''I Forgive You") yet nicely handles roots-rich stompers like "Selma Drye" (about her grandmother), "Buzzin'" and "Ring For Sale."

Pickler wrote three of the songs on the new album, including the title song.

"When I write a song," she says, "I just wrote about who I am and where I've been, where I am and what I'm going through, or about people who have had an impact on me....

"I want to feel what I'm saying. I want it to mean something. I go back to people like Patsy and Tammy, Loretta and Dolly, who can make you cry. You don't always hear that kind of song today. And no matter how good the song is, I have to believe you as you're singing it," according to the Los Angeles Times.

Billboard Magazine describes Pickler as "one of the most charming and personable acts in the business. "The Woman I Am" represents a down-home sound for the singer -- much like her previous set, the critically acclaimed "100 Proof" -- The 615's pick for Best Country Album in 2012. Though the new disc is a little bit more contemporary in places, it's clear that Pickler opted for a similar organic approach."

 

Add Pickler's name to the list of women making outstanding albums in a year where men dominate country radio and the media.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.

QR Code to Kellie Pickler: Why she's an outstanding country artist
Read this article in
https://www.csmonitor.com/The-Culture/Music/2013/1112/Kellie-Pickler-Why-she-s-an-outstanding-country-artist
QR Code to Subscription page
Start your subscription today
https://www.csmonitor.com/subscribe