Taylor Swift says she'll still connect with fans on her stadium tour

Taylor Swift says she still has no trouble feeling close with her fans even when she's performing in arenas. Taylor Swift recently guest-starred on the Fox sitcom 'New Girl' and says she only participates in film or TV projects that really impress her.

Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press/AP
Taylor Swift will perform in Australia and New Zealand this fall.

Taylor Swift shares her feelings and personal experiences on her hit records, but the 23-year-old Grammy winner isn't worried about losing intimacy with her fans on a stadium tour.

"I find that you have to emote a little bigger, but you can reach all the way up to the top," she said. "Eye contact is important, even if it's from 500 yards away."

Swift said she's never worried about the sound being lost in a massive space. With a few shows already under her belt, she feels they've gone pretty well.

"Everyone who comes to these shows seems so engaged," she said. "They come to the show. They know the words. I'm singing the words. We're singing them at the same time, and therein lies the connection. It goes beyond what size the venue is."

She recently embarked on her RED tour of North America. Later this fall, she'll perform in Australia and New Zealand.

Swift, who writes her own songs, has sold more than 75 million albums. She recently appeared on the Fox sitcom "New Girl." And while she likes acting, she has no plans to put aside her guitar and pen – unless something really impresses her.

"I love to write music. And I love to put an album together and take two years to do it and put everything I have into it. (Except) if there was something, some script that came along that was so enticing that I couldn't walk away from it, that I became obsessed with that the way I obsess over music," she said. "If you see me commit to a film, it's only because I couldn't focus on anything else."

Swift was honored as Fragrance Celebrity of the Year at the Fragrance Awards, presented Wednesday night at Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center.

"Getting this award is such an honor," she said on the red carpet before the event.

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