'Godzilla' star Bryan Cranston discusses his new monster film

'Godzilla' actor Cranston says he was attracted by the idea of making a 'character-based monster movie.' 'Godzilla' is now playing in theaters.

Kimberly French/Warner Bros. Pictures/AP
'Godzilla' stars Bryan Cranston (l.) and Aaron Taylor-Johnson (r.).

Bryan Cranston says he's excited to be part of "Godzilla 2014" but almost turned down the role because he was still working on "Breaking Bad" and thought he had to follow with "something serious."

In a recent interview about the film, which opened on May 16, Cranston said he was worried that people might compare the two roles and say, "Oh, that's not anywhere near as good as 'Breaking Bad.'" "I didn't want to have that conversation," the actor added

Cranston, who's currently playing President Lyndon B. Johnson in the Broadway play "All the Way," says he read the "Godzilla" script at his agent's urging and that's what changed his mind. "I was surprised by what I read. I didn't anticipate that," he said.

In chatting with "Godzilla" director Gareth Edwards, Cranston said he realized that the plan was to make a "character-based monster movie and I thought that's pretty cool." He went on to conclude that the TV series and film were so different, they couldn't be compared. "It's different camps altogether," he said.

Cranston said he loved watching the Japanese "Godzilla" films growing up and really bought into the idea "they are actually destroying a city and I didn't realize that it was a man in a suit or anything."

In "Godzilla 2014," Cranston plays a nuclear scientist who becomes obsessed with what caused the destruction of a nuclear power plant in 1999.

The Emmy-winning and Tony-nominated actor ended his role as Walter White on "Breaking Bad" with last year's series finale after a 5-year run. On his wish list now is to do an "extremely long" film series where he could play the same character through different story lines.

Asked if he's looking to become intimate with another character the way he was able to be with Walter White, Cranston responded, "Oh, yeah. That's the whole goal."

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.