Jennifer Lawrence will produce and star in film adaptation of 'The Glass Castle'

Jennifer Lawrence will take on the role of producer as well as star in a movie version of Jeanette Walls' memoir 'The Glass Castle.' 'Producing is something that I have really wanted to do,' Jennifer Lawrence said.

Alessandro Bianchi/Reuters
Jennifer Lawrence will produce and star in 'The Glass Castle.'

Jennifer Lawrence will not only star in the upcoming film adaptation of Jeanette Walls' 2005 best-selling memoir "The Glass Castle," the project will also mark her first time as a producer.

"I don't know if I will be any good, but I'm trying it," Lawrence said of her new post in an interview with The Associated Press at a recent publicity event in Beverly Hills. "So far I am not sure if I am because I am very instinctual, but not very verbal. But producing is something that I have really wanted to do."

The actress attached herself to the adaptation after her mother, Karen Lawrence, fell in love with Walls' story and suggested she read it.

"My mother is like the lucky charm with these kinds of things," said the 23-year-old star of the upcoming "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire." ''She read 'Winter's Bone' and 'Hunger Games' and when I read 'The Glass Castle' I thought it was amazing, so we found Gil Netter, the producer who had the rights to (the book). He and I started talking and now we are developing. We have a director and a writer and it's getting going."

"The Glass Castle," which spent more than 335 weeks on The New York Times best-seller list, details Walls' upbringing as she is raised by an eccentric artist mother and alcoholic father.

The Lionsgate film will be directed by Destin Cretton, who wrote and directed this summer's well-received drama "Short Term 12." The screenplay, which was originally written by Marti Noxon, is being rewritten by Cretton and Andrew Lanham. A production date for the movie has not yet been set.

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