People's Choice Awards: 'The Hunger Games' and Katy Perry dominate

The People's Choice Awards were hosted by 'Big Bang Theory' actress Kaley Cuoco.

Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
The People's Choice Awards winners included 'The Hunger Games,' which stars Liam Hemsworth (l.), Jennifer Lawrence (c.) and Josh Hutcherson (r.).

"The Hunger Games" devoured the competition at the People's Choice Awards, emerging the top victor with five trophies.

Katy Perry won three awards at the Wednesday night ceremony in Los Angeles, at which fans selected the winners in categories spanning music, movies and television.

"Hunger Games" was named favorite movie, action movie and movie franchise, and stars Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson and Liam Hemsworth had fans' favorite on-screen chemistry. Lawrence also won favorite movie actress and "face of heroism."

Perry was the fans' favorite female artist and pop artist. Her video for "Part of Me" also won.

Sandra Bullock picked up the show's first favorite humanitarian award for her efforts in New Orleans.

Actress Kaley Cuoco hosted the ceremony at the Nokia Theatre, where performers included Christina Aguilera, Jason Aldean and Alicia Keys.

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The night's winners:

Movie: "The Hunger Games"

Movie actor: Robert Downey, Jr.

Movie actress: Jennifer Lawrence

Action movie: "The Hunger Games"

Action movie star: Chris Hemsworth

Face of heroism: Jennifer Lawrence, "The Hunger Games"

Comedic movie: "Ted"

Comedic movie actor: Adam Sandler

Comedic movie actress: Jennifer Aniston

Dramatic movie: "The Perks of Being a Wallflower"

Dramatic movie actor: Zac Efron

Dramatic movie actress: Emma Watson

Movie franchise: "The Hunger Games"

Movie superhero: Robert Downey, Jr., "Iron Man"

On-screen chemistry: Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, and Liam Hemsworth, "The Hunger Games"

Movie icon: Meryl Streep

Network TV comedy: "The Big Bang Theory"

Network TV drama: "Grey's Anatomy"

Cable TV comedy: "Awkward"

Cable TV drama: "Leverage"

Premium cable TV show: "True Blood"

TV crime drama: "Castle"

Sci-fi/fantasy TV show: "Supernatural"

Comedic TV actor: Chris Colfer

Comedic TV actress: Lea Michele

Dramatic TV actor: Nathan Fillion

Dramatic TV actress: Ellen Pompeo

Daytime TV host: Ellen DeGeneres

Late-night talk show host: Jimmy Fallon

New talk show host: Steve Harvey

Competition TV show: "The X Factor"

Celebrity judge: Demi Lovato

Male artist: Jason Mraz

Female artist: Katy Perry

Pop artist: Katy Perry

Hip-hop artist: Nicki Minaj

R&B artist: Rihanna

Band: Maroon 5

Country artist: Taylor Swift

Breakout artists: The Wanted

Song: One Direction, "What Makes You Beautiful"

Album: One Direction, "Up All Night"

Music video: Katy Perry, "Part of Me"

People's voice: Christina Aguilera

Humanitarian: Sandra Bullock

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