'Birdman,' 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' lead Oscar nominees

Each movie received a total of nine Academy Award nominations.

Fox Searchlight/AP
This image released by Fox Searchlight shows Ralph Fiennes, left, and Tony Revolori in "The Grand Budapest Hotel. " The film was nominated for an Oscar Award for best feature on Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015. The 87th Annual Academy Awards will take place on Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015 at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Show business satire "Birdman" and colorful caper "The Grand Budapest Hotel" led the Academy Awards nominees on Thursday with nine nods apiece, including best picture, in the quest for Hollywood's top film prize.

The other best picture nominees are "American Sniper," "Boyhood," "The Imitation Game," "Selma," "The Theory of Everything" and "Whiplash." The Academy chose only eight films, although it can nominate up to 10.

British World War Two biopic "The Imitation Game" garnered eight nominations, including best actor for Benedict Cumberbatch, while Iraq war portrait "American Sniper" and Golden Globe winner for best drama, "Boyhood," each earned six.

The Oscars are given out by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. This year's winners will be announced at a ceremony hosted by actor Neil Patrick Harris in Los Angeles on Feb. 22.

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