Monty Python reunion: Coming to a movie theater near you

Monty Python reunion: The British comedy troupe will be stage a reunion in London. Monty Python actors will perform in July on stage and it will be broadcast in more than 600 US movie theaters.

American Monty Python fans who can't attend the troupe's London reunion can always look on the bright side of life. The show will be screened in hundreds of U.S. movie theaters.

The anarchic British comedians are getting back together for 10 shows at London's 02 Arena in July, 34 years after their last stage performance.

Picturehouse Entertainment and Fathom Events say the final performance will be broadcast in more than 600 American cinemas, including branches of the AMC, Cinemark, Regal and Showcase chains. Many will show it live on July 20, with further screenings on July 23 and 24 and Aug. 6. Tickets go on sale Monday.

Python member Eric Idle says fans will get plenty of old favorites, as well as some surprises "that will absolutely freak people out."

The Telegraph reports that Michael Palin says that the Ministry of Silly Walks won't be part of the show, as John Cleese's knees aren't up for such high steps. 

“There is a script [for the show],” he said. “It will be the classics from the Dead Parrot to Upper-Class Twits. And it will be the first time we’ve done the Spanish Inquisition on stage.

“That’s what people want to see. I think they’d be horrified if we came up with new stuff. There will be up-to-date references to news events but that could change from night to night.”

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