Stacey Dash, 'Clueless' star, to be Fox News contributor

Stacey Dash is known for her roles in the 'Clueless' movie and television series. The black actress landed on the political radar for endorsing Republican Mitt Romney over Democrat Barack Obama in the last presidential election.

Peter Kramer/AP/File
Actress Stacey Dash arrives at the Vanity Fair Oscar party in West Hollywood, Calif., in 2010. Fox News Channel is bringing on actress Stacey Dash as a paid contributor.

Fox News Channel has gone Hollywood for its latest hire. The news network is bringing on actress Stacey Dash as a paid contributor.

Dash is known for her roles in the "Clueless" movie and television series. The black actress landed on the political radar for endorsing Republican Mitt Romney over Democrat Barack Obama in the last presidential election. She was heavily criticized in the black community for supporting the white candidate.

Fox News programming executive Bill Shine said Wednesday that Dash will offer cultural analysis and commentary across several of the network's programs.

Fox and the other cable news networks have been slumping in the ratings with a relatively slow news stretch this year.

Fox's list of contributors includes Karl Rove, James Carville, George Will, Dennis Miller and Sarah Palin.

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