Bob Barker returns to 'The Price is Right.' Why?

Bob Barker will return to host the game show 'The Price is Right' on his 90th birthday in December. Bob Barker retired in 2007, after 35 years of hosting the CBS show.

CBS says "The Price is Right" is planning a milestone birthday celebration for former host Bob Barker.

Barker will celebrate his 90th birthday with an appearance on the game show in December, the network said Tuesday. He retired as host in 2007 after 35 years with "The Price is Right."

The show also will pay tribute to Barker's longtime animal activism by featuring pet adoptions during the week of Dec. 9-13.

Barker will be on "The Price is Right" on his birthday, Dec. 12, and will present a special showcase to mark the occasion, CBS said.

"The Price is Right," with host Drew Carey, airs weekdays at 11 a.m. Eastern.

Earlier this month, Barker, who is an avid animal rights advocate paid nearly $1 million for three elephants to be shipped from Canada to a sanctuary in California.

The 89-year-old Barker was on hand late Sunday to welcome the pachyderms to the Performing Animal Welfare Society's ARK 2000 compound in the hills near San Andreas, The Sacramento Bee reported.

"It was more than emotional for me, for all of us," Barker said. "I had tears in my eyes and a lump in my throat. It's hard to believe they are finally here."

The African elephants — Iringa, Thika and Toka — had been living at the Toronto Zoo. The Toronto City Council agreed two years ago to send them to the sanctuary following lobbying efforts by Barker and others who don't think elephants and other large animals belong at most zoos.

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