John Mellencamp teenage sons to face battery charges

John Mellencamp has a pair of teenage boys who allegedly attacked another Indiana teenager at a local house party. Authorities say, in addition to John Mellencamp's sons, the son of Indiana University's baseball coach was involved in the attack.

Matt Rourke/AP/File
This 2012 file photo shows John Mellencamp performing during a campaign rally at the American Civil War Center at the Historic Tredegar Ironworks, in Richmond, Va.

Rocker John Mellencamp's two teenage sons face battery charges for allegedly punching and kicking a man during a fight that left the victim with serious facial injuries.

Monroe County prosecutors on Thursday charged 19-year-old Hud Mellencamp of Nashville, Ind., and 18-year-old Speck Mellencamp, of Bloomington, with one count each of battery resulting in serious bodily injury.

Ty A. Smith, 19, of Bloomington, faces the same charge in the early morning July 29 attack. The Herald-Times reports that Smith is the son of Indiana University baseball coach Tracy Smith and is a walk-on for IU's football team.

The Bloomington Police Department said in a statement late Thursday afternoon that investigators were trying to contact the Mellencamp brothers and Smith to make arrangements for them to surrender.

A probable cause affidavit states that Speck Mellencamp punched 19-year-old Alexander Bucy in the face on the porch of Bucy's Bloomington home because he thought Bucy had hit him earlier that evening at Bucy's house party. Hud Mellencamp and Smith joined in, and the trio allegedly "punched, kicked and stomped" Bucy, the document states.

When Bucy was able to get to his feet, Speck Mellencamp allegedly knocked him backward off the porch onto a sidewalk two to three feet below, where Speck Mellencamp punched Bucy until someone pulled him away. The Mellencamp brothers and Smith then allegedly ran from the scene.

Speck Mellencamp told officers he had been at a party at Bucy's home earlier when two girls began fighting over him, and that a white male punched him as he tried to halt the girls' fight. Mellencamp said his assailant ran into the house.

He said he "was very upset about being punched" but soon left and went home, where he, his brother and Smith decided to return.

Hud and Speck Mellencamp are the sons of John Mellencamp — whose hits include "Hurts So Good" and "Pink Houses" — and his third wife, model Elaine Irwin. The couple divorced in 2011 after 19 years of marriage.

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