Kirk Cameron is 'Unstoppable' on Facebook, YouTube

Kirk Cameron called on fans to lift the Facebook and YouTube bans on the 'Unstoppable' movie trailer. And both bans were lifted thanks to the support from the Kirk Cameron Christian fan base.

Facebook has responded to actor Kirk Cameron's allegations that it was deliberately trying to stop users from accessing the trailer and website for his upcoming film "Unstoppable."

Cameron's film was marked as "spam" on both the social networking site and YouTube, thus preventing anyone from posting a link to it or its trailer. After Cameron mobilized his followers to protest, the ban was lifted.

Facebook responded today, telling TheWrap in a statement that the ban was a mistake from its automated systems.

"To protect the hundreds of millions of people who connect and share on Facebook every day, we have automated systems that work in the background to maintain a trusted environment and protect our users from bad actors who often use links to spread spam and malware."

"These systems are so effective that most people who use Facebook will never encounter spam," the statement continued. "They're not perfect, though, and in rare instances they make mistakes. This link was blocked for a very short period of time after being misidentified as a potential spam or malware site. We learn from rare cases such as these to make our systems even better."

After Facebook lifted the ban, EOnline reported that Cameron put out a call to fans to help get YouTube to lift its ban: "You all just demonstrated to the press (they are all calling me to talk about your amazing response!) that the communities of faith, hope, and love are, well... unstoppable," Cameron wrote in a subsequent message. "Now can you all talk to YouTube?? They have blocked and labeled the Unstoppable trailer as 'spam,' 'scam,' and deceptive! We did it once, we can do it again."

YouTube also lifted its ban on the trailer promoting the religious-themed documentary. The promotional clip announced Sept. 24 screenings of the film across the United States and a live question and answer session with Cameron planned at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va.

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