Lollapalooza performers announced: Who made the cut?

Lollapalooza's headliners this summer include The Cure, in their very first Lollapalooza appearance, plus Mumford and Sons, The Killers, and Nine Inch Nails.

Jason DeCrow/Invision/AP
Marcus Mumford, lead singer of Mumford & Sons, performs at the Barclays Center in New York on Feb. 6. Mumford and Sons will be one of the headliners at the Lollapalooza music festival in Chicago's Grant Park in August 2013.

The Cure will make their first Lollapalooza appearance in the festival's more than 20-year history this summer, joining fellow headliners Mumford and Sons, The Killers and Nine Inch Nails, Lollapalooza founder Perry Farrell announced Monday.

"It is so exciting to have The Cure at Lollapaloooza for the first time because I love The Cure and we've never had them," Farrell, also the lead singer of Jane's Addiction, said. "It's always frustrated me and made me feel incomplete and now I can feel complete and die."

Other acts among the lineup of some 130 bands include Phoenix, Thievery Corporation, Tegan and Sara, Cat Power, New Order, and Lana Del Rey. Vampire Weekend will play the Aug. 2-4 festival in Chicago just months after their upcoming album, "Modern Vampires of the City," is released in May. The Lumineers, coming off last year's hit "Hey Ho," will also perform.

Nine Inch Nails played the original Lollapalooza in 1991 and last played the festival in 2008.

Mumford and Sons rises to a headlining spot this year. In 2010 they played in the middle of the day. Their latest album, "Babel," has sold more than 1 million copies.

"They are going to make their victory lap at Lollapalooza this year," Farrell said.

The lineup includes Lollapalooza's well-known mix of indie bands, singer-songwriters, and country, hip-hop, rock, and electronic acts. Musicians come from across the U.S. and the world, including countries like Australia, Brazil, Chile, Greece, and Sweden.

"We don't look to stylize our lineup so much as we just stay away from pop garbage," said Farrell, who in the past has said he sees himself as a music curator when arranging each festival lineup.

"Sometimes it's not what I'm going to do. It's what I'm not going to do that sets your trend," he said.

In recent years, headliners have included Lady Gaga, Green Day, Eminem and Coldplay. The full lineup is available on Lollapalooza's website.

The Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival, the other major summer music festival in the U.S., has slotted Paul McCartney, Wilco, and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers as their headliners this year. Mumford and Sons are also playing Bonnaroo, to be held June 13-16 in Manchester, Tenn.

This year marks Lollapalooza's ninth anniversary in Chicago's lakefront Grant Park. Last year's festival sold out at 100,000 visitors a day, or 300,000 over the three-day event. Three-day passes priced at between $75 and $235 for this year are sold out. One-day passes are still available.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.