Shia Labeouf drops out of Broadway play. Why?

Shia LaBeouf left the play "Orphans"  "due to creative differences," said producers. Shia LaBeouf was cast to play opposite Alec Baldwin in the Broadway play.

First, he ditched the "Transformers." Now Shia LaBeouf is pulling the plug on his Broadway debut.

The star of the "Transformers" franchise had been slated to appear opposite Alec Baldwin in "Orphans" but producers said Wednesday that LaBeouf would not be continuing "due to creative differences."

The play by Lyle Kessler, which premiered in 1983, tells the story of two orphaned brothers living in a decrepit Philadelphia row house who decide to kidnap a wealthy man. LaBeouf played one brother and Baldwin the target.

An alleged email exchange between LaBeouf and director Daniel Sullivan was published by the The Hollywood Reporter:

"LaBeouf tweeted an Orphans audition video as well as screenshots of email exchanges between himself and other parties with addresses allegedly belonging to Sullivan, Baldwin and playwright Lyle Kessler. In one back-and-forth, he apologizes to Baldwin "for my part of a dis-agreeable [sic] situation."

Sullivan's response: "I'm too old for disagreeable situations. you're one hell of a great actor. Alec is who he is. you are who you are. you two are incompatible. i should have known it. this one will haunt me. you tried to warn me. you said you were a different breed. i didn't get it."

"Orphans" opens March 19 at the Schoenfeld Theatre, directed by Daniel Sullivan. Producers said an announcement on LaBeouf's replacement would be made soon.

LaBeouf, whose films include "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" and "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps," was most recently seen in John Hillcoat's crime drama "Lawless."

Earlier this year, LaBeouf said that he won't be doing any more Hollywood blockbusters in favor of riskier, independent film projects.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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