SNL: Usain Bolt is fast, but is he funny?

SNL: Usain Bolt joined a parody of the vice presidential debate on SNL. In the sketch, Paul Ryan, claimed he (not Usain Bolt) won the 100-meter race at the London Olympics

REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao
Jamaican Olympic gold medallist Usain Bolt shows off his gold medal during an event at the Nissan Motor Co's headquarters in Yokohama, south of Tokyo October 11, 2012.

 "Saturday Night Live" parodied the vice presidential debate with a little help from the world's fastest man.

Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt dropped by the NBC sketch show's mock debate after Taran Killam, playing Mitt Romney's running mate, Paul Ryan, claimed he won the 100-meter race at the London Olympics. Ryan has been criticized for exaggerating his marathon time.

"Ryan" then asks his "training partner," Bolt, to verify his claims.

Bolt won the 100 meters at the London Olympics with a time of 9.63 seconds, a new Olympic record.

"SNL" had fun with the vice presidential candidates following Thursday's contentious debate. While President Barack Obama and Romney's first debate didn't offer as much obvious satire, the show happily skewered Vice President Joe Biden and Ryan.

Jason Sudeikis, as Biden, called himself "Big Daddy Joe" and insisted he was "monkey strong" unlike his younger foe, whom he referred to as "shark eyes." Killam played Ryan with an Eddie Munster-like widow's peak.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

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