Chad Everett remembered for 'Medical Center,' other TV and film dramas

The actor who starred in both television and film roles passed away Tuesday in southern California after a long illness.

Courtesy Katherine Thorp/AP
This undated photo released by Katherine Thorp shows Chad Everett, the star of the 1970s TV series “Medical Center.” Everett, who went on to appear in such films and shows as “Mulholland Drive” and “Melrose Place,” died Tuesday, July 24.

Chad Everett, the blue-eyed star of the 1970s TV series "Medical Center" who went on to appear in such films and TV shows as "Mulholland Drive" and "Melrose Place," has died.

Everett's daughter, Katherine Thorp, said he died Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles.

Everett played sensitive surgeon Joe Gannon for seven seasons on "Medical Center." The role earned him Golden Globe nominations in 1971 and 1973.

With a career spanning more than 40 years, Everett guest starred on such TV series as "The Love Boat," ''Murder, She Wrote" and "Without a Trace." Everett most recently appeared on the TV shows "Castle" and "Supernatural," where he appeared as an older version of Jensen Ackles' character Dean Winchester.

Everett's films credits included "The Jigsaw Murders," ''The Firechasers" and director Gus Van Sant's remake of "Psycho."

Everett was born Raymon Lee Cramton in South Bend, Ind., and graduated from Wayne State University in Detroit before moving to Los Angeles and becoming a contract player with MGM.

In perhaps his most memorable recent film role, Everett played a lothario who engages in a steamy audition with a young ingenue portrayed by Naomi Watts in director David Lynch's "Mulholland Drive".

Everett is survived by his two daughters, Katherine and Shannon, and six grandchildren. He was married to actress Shelby Grant for 45 years until her death last year.

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