Signs of spring: asparagus with creamy brie dressing

You can serve the dressing drizzled over the spears on a platter, or on individual plates for serving a seated meal, or serve it as a dip for an appetizer.

The Runaway Spoon
Asparagus with creamy brie dressing.

Fresh spring asparagus I such a lovely thing to serve at an Easter brunch, or any spring occasion really. It can easily be made ahead, it’s hugely adaptable, plus, it always looks so pretty on the table. I have several lovely oblong dishes that seem made for asparagus, and I love asparagus serving tongs.

So I am always looking for a pretty and unique way to serve a pile of perfect green spears. And I love anything with brie. I’ve made this dressing for years and served it over baby lettuces with chopped apples and pears, walnuts and crispy bacon (and I recommend you do the same). But as spring arrived and Easter approaches, I wanted to share some great brunch ideas and use spring produce. It hit me that brie and asparagus would be very happy together.

The dressing is thick and creamy, tinged a lovely pale celadon by the chives. You can serve the dressing napped over the spears on a platter, or individual plates for serving a seated meal, or serve it as a dip. When I find gorgeous, local, fresh spring asparagus I just barely blanch it, but if yours is a bit woody or thick, feel free to cook it a little longer, or toss the spears very lightly with olive oil and roast.

Asparagus with creamy brie dressing
Makes about 1 1/2 cups dressing

7 ounces brie cheese
1/3 cup whole milk
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
3 Tablespoons olive oil
1 clove garlic
1 Tablespoon roughly chopped chives
generous pinch sea salt
generous grinds black pepper
2 pounds asparagus

1. Use a thin, sharp knife to remove the rind from the brie. It’s easiest to do this when the brie is cold. Don’t be too precious, some rind is perfectly fine and you don’t want to lose too much cheese. Cut the brie into chunks and place in a blender. Leave to come to room temperature. Add the remaining ingredients and blend until very smooth. The dressing can be made several hours ahead – refrigerate it in the blender carafe and give it one more whir before using.

2. Fill a sink or large bowl with ice water, then fil a large pot with water and bring to a boil. Break off the woody ends of the asparagus, and when the water is boiling, drop in the asparagus. Cook just until the asparagus is bright green, but still tender, about 2 minutes. Immediately transfer the asparagus to the ice water with tongs. When the asparagus is cold, transfer to a clean tea towel and pat dry.

3. The asparagus can be blanched several hours ahead. Store on the platter or in zip-top bags in the fridge.

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