Asian burritos

Leftover roasted pork loin becomes a delicious burrito when combined with pickled vegetables.

Yates Yummies
Leftover roasted pork loin becomes a delicious burrito when combined with pickled vegetables.

Last weekend I found myself in a little predicament. We had come back home after being in Florida just in time to host an extended family get together. Because of the circumstances, I fell back on my usual easy go-to meal for a crowd: Classic Coleslaw and Barbecue Baked Beans.

But since it was way too cold to grill, I took the easy way out and oven roasted pork loin with a neutral rub. I served it sliced thin with BBQ sauce and little slider buns. That turned out great; my problem was that the next day, I still had a houseful of people to feed and nothing in the refrigerator but leftovers!

I had a package of flour tortillas, extra cooked pork, the remains of a vegetable tray, an unopened bag of coleslaw mix, and some Asian condiments. The perfect thing to do was make Asian burritos. It turned out to be a big hit – maybe even more fun than the dinner the night before.

Everyone could make their own just the way they wanted and we all had a good laugh at my ineptness at rolling a burrito!

Asian burritos
Serves 6

1 pound cooked pork tenderloin cut into 18 slices (suggestions for cooking below)
6 large flour tortillas
1-1/2 cups carrots, cut into matchstick sized pieces
1-1/2 cups cucumber, cut into matchstick sized pieces
1-1/2 cups red onion, cut into thin slices
3 cups white vinegar
1 (14 oz.) package of coleslaw mix
1/2 cup olive or vegetable oil
3 tablespoons rice wine vinegar or white vinegar
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon garlic chili sauce, divided (I used Huy Fong brand)
1 cup mayonnaise
Bunch of fresh cilantro

As I mentioned above, I just used a very neutral, but still delicious rub and baked it in the oven at 425 degrees F. For a 1-pound tenderloin, a cooking time of 20 minutes will yield an internal temperature of 145 degrees F. For those who like their pork on the well done side, 30 minutes of cooking time will bring it up to 155 degrees F. and 40 minutes brings it a bit past 160 degrees F.

It could also be grilled over medium heat for the same amount of times.

Neutral pork rub

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 garlic gloves, minced or put through a press
1 tablespoon lemon pepper
2 teaspoons kosher salt

But – if planning ahead is an option, here is a recipe for an incredibly delicious marinade. It is the family recipe from my Vietnamese friend Kim. Whisk all the ingredients together and let the pork marinate for several hours. Kim says grilling is best, but baking works fine.

Thit Nuong pork rub

4 cloves garlic, smashed
2 tablespoons oyster sauce
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 tablespoon Maggi soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

To assemble burritos:

1. Place the carrots, cucumbers, and onions is separate containers. Pour 1 cup of vinegar over each one and set aside for five to 10 minutes.

2. In a small bowl, whisk together oil, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil  and 1 teaspoon garlic chili sauce.

3. In a second small bowl, whisk together mayonnaise and 1 tablespoon garlic chili sauce.

4. Heat the tortillas up by wrapping them in a couple paper towels and cook on full power in the microwave for 30 seconds.

5. Place the tortillas on serving plates.

6. Spread a heaping 1/2 cup of the coleslaw mix on each tortilla.

7. Sprinkle a tablespoon of the oil and vinegar mixture over each coleslaw covered tortilla.

8. Top each tortilla with three slices of tenderloin.

9. Drain the pickled vegetables and evenly divide them over each tortilla.

10. Sprinkle a heaping tablespoon of cilantro leaves over the top.

11. Spoon 1 tablespoon of the mayonnaise mixture over each tortilla.

12. Roll each one up by folding it in half, then pulling the top side halfway back. Next fold the perpendicular sides in and finally roll to close it up.

Related posts on Yates Yummies: Classic Coleslaw and Barbecue Baked Beans.

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