Pumpkin spice mocha pudding cake

This gluten-free pudding combines pumpkin, spice, coffee, and chocolate into a delicious warm mess. Smother it with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream.

Kitchen Report
A delicious combination of pumpkin, spice, coffee, and chocolate for a decadent gluten-free pudding topped with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream.

Pumpkin spice is everywhere (again) this fall so why not join the fun with this delicious combination of pumpkin, spice, coffee, and chocolate for a decadent gluten-free pudding topped with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream? It may just give pumpkin pie a nudge at your holiday table.

A friend of mine shared this link for a gluten-free, vegan version of this pudding, which looked amazing. I had been invited to a dessert potluck on Halloween so I figured testing it out would be a good opportunity to get a crowd reaction. But not having the patience to grind my own oat flour and buy lots of extra ingredients as the original recipe requires – and having some coconut flour on hand – I decided to try my own gluten-free version. (I personally don't subscribe to gluten-free diets, I just see it as a current culinary challenge.)

After I pulled the concoction out of the oven, I was a little concerned. It certainly wasn’t going to win for “cutest dessert at the potluck.” I sampled a bit to make sure it wasn't a total #kitchenfail. It tasted delicious but was a bit … loose, not at all “gooey” like the original recipe promised. The pumpkin filling helps to hold everything together, but one thing I’m learning about cooking with gluten-free flours such as coconut flour is that they crumble pretty easily. Coconut flour especially absorbs a lot of liquid. (I know there are fixes out there, but I’m not there yet. I’m just experimenting.)

After arriving at the potluck with the pudding still warm, I set up my dessert offering next to a tub of vanilla ice cream and hoped for the best.

I was pleasantly surprised that several people remarked how much they liked this combination of flavors. A spoonful with a scoop of creamy vanilla is a bit like having a cup of coffee with your pumpkin pie and a chaser of chocolate. This experiment definitely had a sweet ending.

Pumpkin spice mocha pudding cake
Adapted from Oh She Glows

1 egg
1-1/2 cups coconut flour
3/4 cup sugar
1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/3 cup chopped dark chocolate
1/2-3/4 teaspoon salt, to taste
1/2 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons almond milk
1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons unsweetened pumpkin puree
1/2 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1 tablespoon cocoa powder
1/4 cup sugar
1-1/4 cup hot coffee (use decaf, if desired)

Vanilla ice cream and toasted chopped pecans for toppings

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. and lightly grease an 8-inch square glass baking dish with oil.2. In a small bowl, whisk egg and set aside.

3. In a large bowl, stir together the coconut flour, 3/4 cup sugar, 1/3 cup cocoa powder, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, ground chocolate, salt, and baking powder.

4. Add milk, pumpkin, and vanilla, to the egg mixture.

5. Pour wet mixture onto dry ingredients and stir until thoroughly combined.

6. Scoop the batter into the prepared glass dish and smooth out evenly with a spoon. Using coconut flour, the mix will be more crumbly than smooth.

7. Combine the remaining tablespoon of cocoa powder and 1/4 cup sugar. Sprinkle all of it evenly over the cake batter.

8. Slowly pour the hot coffee over the cocoa powder and sugar mixture ensuring that the coffee completely covers the powder and sugar.

9. Carefully place the dish into the oven, uncovered. Bake at 375 degrees F. for about 20 to 25 minutes or until the cake is semi-firm on the top.

10. Let the cake cool for 10 minutes and then serve warm with vanilla ice cream and toasted pecans.

Related post on Kitchen Report: Ginger cookie pumpkin ice cream sandwiches

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