Tomato gorgonzola butter pasta sauce

Pasta tossed with this rich sauce makes a great family meal. Serve with a simple side salad and a loaf of warm crusty bread, and an easy weeknight dinner turns elegant.  

The Runaway Spoon
Sweet tomatoes and sharp gorgonzola compliment each other nicely in this creamy pasta sauce finished with butter.

I love a recipe that combines weeknight elegance and weeknight easy. And this sauce takes very little time to whip up with results that are unique and packed with flavor.

The combination of tomatoes and blue cheese – sweet and tangy – is an absolute winner. Pasta tossed in this rich sauce makes a great family meal, or an impressive dish to serve to company. You can even make the sauce a little ahead, and put it all together right before serving.

Blending the cheese with butter adds a silky richness to the sauce that sets it apart, like the finest French sauces finished with butter. Use a pasta with crevices to catch the wonderful sauce. A salad with a light vinaigrette and nice, crusty loaf of bread round out the meal.

Tomato gorgonzola butter pasta sauce
Serves 4

1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, softened
6 ounces gorgonzola cheese, crumbled
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup chopped onion
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 (14.5-ounce) can crushed tomatoes
1 tablespoon chopped fresh marjoram or oregano
Salt and pepper to taste
16 ounces short pasta like penne or cavatappi

1. Mash the butter and gorgonzola together in a small bowl using a fork and set aside.

2. Sauté the chopped onion in the olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat until soft and translucent. Add the garlic and sauté for a further minute, just until fragrant. Pour in the tomatoes, then swish out the can with 1/4 cup of water and add it to the sauce. Stir in the chopped marjoram and cook until the sauce is quite thick, about 10-12 minutes.

3. You can prepare the recipe up to this point about an hour ahead.

4. When ready to serve, cook the pasta in a large pot of salted boiling water according to package instructions. Drain well. While the pasta is cooking, bring the tomato sauce up to a low simmer, then whisk in the gorgonzola butter bit by bit until melted and smooth. Return the pasta to the cooking pot and toss with the sauce until well coated.

5. Serve immediately.

Related post on The Runaway Spoon: Tomato, Brie and Herb Pasta

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