Thanksgiving recipe: Cranberry tangerine relish

Bring a little zest to your Thanksgiving table. This raw cranberry relish is sweet and tangy with a definite twist with using tangerines instead of oranges.

The Runaway Spoon
Cranberry and tangerine relish for Thanksgiving is also great used as a topping in leftover turkey sandwiches.

I am pretty traditional about the cranberries on the Thanksgiving table. I have to have my traditional cooked cranberry sauce. But I like to mix things up sometimes and have a second version as well. But I am not from the jiggly can of cranberry sauce camp, so it’s a chance to get creative.

This raw relish is sweet and tangy with a definite twist. Usually made with oranges, I find the sweetness of tangerines a special touch. You can use small tangerines, larger honey tangerines or even clementines. Serve this with the big meal, and there will still be lots left to go beside leftover sandwiches.

Cranberry tangerine relish

8 ounces whole tangerines
8 ounces fresh cranberries
1/2 cup pecan halves
1 cup sugar

1. Cut the tangerines into pieces – skins and all – and place in the food processor fitted with the metal blade. Pulse six to seven times to break up the tangerines.

2. Add the whole cranberries, sugar, pecans and pulse until you have a rough relish. Scrape down the sides of the bowl a couple of times and make sure everything is well combined.

3. Scoop the relish into a bowl, cover and refrigerate for several hours or up to a week. If lots of liquid accumulates in the bowl, you can drain the relish.

Editor's note: The original recipe uses bourbon, to see the original recipe, to go TheRunawaySpoon.com

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