A new twist for artichoke dip

Goat cheese, lemon, capers, and Greek yogurt stand in for mayonnaise in this artichoke spread. A food processor makes this simple savory spread a snap.

The Runaway Spoon
Frozen artichoke hearts that have not been marinated or brined work best for this recipe.

Creamy artichoke dip has long been a staple a parties and gatherings. Lots of mayonnaise and marinated artichoke hearts and gooey cheese. It has never been a favorite of mine, because it is so rich and always tastes more of mayonnaise than anything else. 

I set out to create a dish everyone would be intrigued by, but surprised to find it veered so from the classic. I’ve seen recipes pairing artichokes and goat cheese, but wanted to add a lot of tang to complement the artichokes. Goat cheese, lemon, capers, and yogurt give this spread body and zip, with the added herbs for layered flavors.

I prefer using frozen artichoke hearts that have not been marinated or brined to keep their flavor up front. This spread is so easy to prepare but gives such complex results it’s a real party trick. It is wonderful spread on toasted baguette slices, but it can be dipped with hearty chips. It’s good spread on a bagel, too.

Artichoke, goat cheese, and lemon spread

1 (14-ounce) package frozen artichoke hearts

1 clove garlic

2 tablespoons fresh oregano

2 tablespoons fresh parsley

1 tablespoon capers in brine

Zest of 1 medium lemon

2–3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, to taste

4 ounces soft goat cheese

6 ounces Greek yogurt

1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Salt and pepper to taste

1. Cook the artichoke hearts according to the package directions. Drain and leave to cool.

2. Place the artichoke hearts, garlic, herbs, and capers in the bowl of a food processor and pulse several times to break everything up. Add the remaining ingredients and process until smooth and spreadable. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

3. Scrape the spread into a bowl, cover and refrigerate for several hours to allow the flavors to meld. Serve with toasted baguette slices or crackers.

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