Tailgating recipe challenge: How to enter

We're looking for your favorite tailgating and game day recipes. From nachos, to sliders, to dips, e-mail food@csps.com your recipe and football fan memories.

Jake Turcotte/The Christian Science Monitor
Hey, football fans! Got a favorite tailgating or game day recipe? Share it with Stir It Up!, and you could win a signed copy of ESPN's Todd Blackledge's cookbook, 'Taste of the Town.'
'Taste of the Town, a Guided Tour of College Football's Best Places to Eat' by Todd Blackledge and JR Rosenthal (206 pp., Center Street, $20)

Here at Stir It Up! we love a good tailgate or a watch party, and we know good eats play a big part when fans get together – no matter who's winning. We're looking for your favorite game day appetizers, casseroles, and crowd pleasers to share with Stir It Up! readers. If we pick your entry as our favorite submission you will receive a signed copy of ESPN's cookbook "Taste of the Town" by Todd Blacklege, a former quarterback for Penn State and the Kansas City Chiefs, and current college football analyst.

Send your favorite tailgating or game day recipe to food@csps.com. Please include an ingredient list, step-by-step numbered instructions, along with your name, hometown, and e-mail address. We also want to hear your football story, is the recipe tied to your college team? Your hometown team? An old family favorite? 

Please submit your recipe and football story by October 7. We will contact the winner. The winner's recipe will appear in Stir It Up! and he or she will receive a signed copy of "Taste of the Town" by Todd Blackledge. (This contest is not open to employees of CSMonitor.com or their families.)

Show us your creations: We love food photos. So feel free to send us photos of your game day recipes or your football memories. (Hint: natural light works best. For reproduction on the Web, photos should be 600 x 400 DPI.) Pin your photo on Pinterest or tweet your Instagram picture using the hashtag #tailgatingchallenge. Follow us on Pinterest and Twitter for contest updates.

We look forward to hearing from you! If you have any questions, please feel to be in touch: food@csps.com

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