Cauliflower 'couscous' salad with plums and prosciutto

Graining cauliflower is a great alternative to rice, quinoa, or couscous. Pairing plums and proscuitto makes for a playful sweet, tart, and salty combination in this salad.

Beyond the Peel
Prosciutto and fruit can work well together. Try this salad using riced cauliflower, couscous, or even just arugula as a base.

Today was one of those days when I wanted a couscous salad. Without any couscous to be had, I made do. I’d used the idea of ‘ricing’ cauliflower before and I’d seen it used in a risotto (brilliant but have yet to try it!), as rice and as couscous. There seemed to be no time like the present to try it. It helped that the pressure was on, because I had a cauliflower going bad in the fridge. Kinda like the time I made this. It was one of those ‘use it or lose it’ moments.

The other ingredients in this recipe come from a most brilliant surprise. A visit from my sister! You should know, out here any visit at all is really nice, but a visit from a sister is truly special. Like Christmas! She even came bearing gifts! Of course in my house, the best gifts of all tend to be food.

The treats were far too many to list here, but the two that concern this recipe are prosciutto and plums.

A lot of people know about the special relationship that cantaloupe or honeydew have with prosciutto, but few realize that plums and prosciutto have a similar kind of kindred friendship. You don’t have to try the cauliflower couscous to pair these two buddies together. Try it on your next arugula salad and be dazzled by the play of sweet, tart, and salty.

That being said, you don’t know need to have plums and prosciutto to try out the versatility of ricing cauliflower (and you don’t even have to wait for it to start turning brown either). You could toss it with any of your favorite ingredients or use it in place of quinoa. It’s a wonderful grain-free option, light on the calories, and a great way of sneaking in more veggies into a meal.

Cauliflower couscous salad with plums and prosciutto
Serves 2

1 small head of cauliflower

1 garlic clove, minced

1 plum

2 slices of prosciutto, torn

1 cup Italian flat leaf parsley

Juice of half lemon

Olive oil

Salt and pepper, to taste

1. Cut the cauliflower into florets. Using a food processor, process the cauliflower into rice sized (or a little smaller) pieces.

2. In a large frying pan, heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the cauliflower and cook until just tender, about 5 minutes. Don’t over cook. To expedite the cooling process, lay the rice cauliflower mixture onto a cookie sheet (I placed mine in the fridge). Once reasonably cooled (room temperature is good enough) drizzle with olive oil, and squeeze the lemon juice all over it. Season liberally with salt and pepper.

3. While the cauliflower is chilling, thinly slice the plum, tear the prosciutto and take the leaves off the parsley. If you don’t like big leaves of parsley it can be chopped.

4. Toss the ingredients together. Serve in two bowls and garnish with a lemon wedge.

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.