Green power smoothie

Avocado is the secret ingredient in this smoothie that packs in your daily greens and fruit into one glass for a meal on the go.

Beyond The Peel
This power smoothie combines avocado with frozen berries, greens, and yogurt into an on-the-go meal that won't leave you hungry.

I love smoothies for breakfast, lunch (sometimes), and even dinner – especially after Bikram Yoga.

There’s a problem though. I usually don’t find that they “last” very long.

Until now. I have been drinking this new smoothie for weeks, more often maybe than I should. But when things are busy, smoothies are magic. I blend this up and I can even drink it on my way to work. Actually, my work has a blender so sometimes I just pack it all in a plastic container and dump it into the blender for a midday boost. I never get to stop for lunch, so this smoothie has been a lifesaver.

Want to know what the secret ingredient is?

Avocado.

I have tried it with soaked nuts, nut butters, super food filler, chia seeds, ground flax seed and, to be fair, they are all delicious. It’s just that I get hungry so fast. I’ve tried making this same smoothie without the avocado and substituting, ground flax or ground chia seeds, but it’s really not as good. It’s OK, but the smoothie is definitely better with than without.

This smoothie is just sweet enough, a little tart and creamy and the best part – green. The flavor is like that Happy Planets Green Smoothie, but a little less sweet. I’ve added some suggestions at the end in case you like it sweeter, or if you’re new to whole foods and need to build up to putting so many greens in one glass.

Green Power Smoothie

3 cups of greens (kale, chard, spinach or spring greens.)

1/2 cup frozen blueberries

1/2 cup red frozen fruit (I use sour cherries or frozen cranberries mixed)

1 banana

1/2 avocado, flesh only

1/4 cup plain Greek yogurt or vegans: use coconut milk (I use Tree Island Vanilla Yogurt which is not sweet)

1/4 wedge of lemon, juice only

1/2 cup water (up to 1 cup)

Optional additions (1 tablespoon of ground flax or ground chia seeds)

In a blender, add the greens. If using kale, remove the tough spine and use only the tender parts. With chard I use the whole thing. Add the blueberries, red berries, banana (this lends the sweetness), the avocado, yogurt, squeeze of lemon juice (this masks the taste of the greens) and the water. Blend until smooth. You may need to use the pulse setting to get everything blended properly. Add a little more water if it’s too thick. Drink immediately.

Recipe notes:

Key ingredients are banana, avocado, greens and lemon juice.

Banana: Bananas makes it sweet without adding sweeteners like honey or maple syrup or soaked dates. If you like it sweeter, add a little sweetener of choice until you’ve reached the level you’re looking for.

Avocado: It makes this liquid meal last, so you won’t feel hungry again in an hour.

Lemon Juice: It masks the taste of the dark leafy greens. I’ve even made this smoothie with broccoli. The texture isn’t as smooth, but it works in a pinch.

Dark Leafy Greens: If 3 cups of greens sounds like too much, start with one and build up. The healthiest way to consume kale and chard is to have it lightly steamed. If you would like to add a step, steam the chard or kale ahead of time and add it to the smoothie cooked.

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