Buttermilk pancakes for Pancake Day

Pancake Day, also known as Shrove Tuesday, is Feb. 12. Top these classic buttermilk pancakes with fruit and syrup of your choice for a sweet start to the day.

Tastes Like Home
A delicious stack of buttermilk pancakes topped with butter and maple syrup.

Feb. 12, 2013 is Pancake Day. It is also Carnival Tuesday in Trinidad and Tobago, Panama, and Dominica – the last day of feasting and frolicking before the beginning of Lent.
 
While pancakes are enjoyed all year round, there is something special about having them on Pancake Day, especially the Guyanese-style pancakes which are more like the Portuguese malasadas, a direct influence of food of that country on Guyana. They are puffy nuggets of doughnuts. I like them the traditional way I grew up having them, with homemade syrup but for the past two years, I have also been rolling them into cinnamon sugar. They are so good with tea or your favorite hot beverage.

The easiest way to celebrate Pancake Day, though, is with these classic buttermilk pancakes. Enjoy them with your favorite fruit toppings and syrup.

Buttermilk Pancakes

Makes 8 to 12 pancakes

2 eggs, room temperature

2 cups buttermilk, room temperature

2 cups all purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

3 tablespoons sugar

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon (optional)

A pinch of salt

Vegetable oil

1. Mix together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, cinnamon and salt and set aside.

2. Whisk together the buttermilk and eggs.

3. Mix together the flour mixture and the buttermilk-egg mixture until just combined. Do not over mix. Cover and let rest at room temperature for 10 to 15 minutes.

4. Brush pan or griddle with oil and heat over medium heat. Add a couple drops of water to test if the pan is heated enough. If the water sizzles for about 3 to 4 seconds, it’s ready. If the water sizzle and dissipates almost immediately, the pan is too hot, reduce the heat.           

5. Pour batter 1/3 cup or 1/2 cup at a time, into the center of the pan, spread lightly if you like with the bottom of the ladle or cup. Let cook until bubbles form, run your spatula along the edges and bottom of the pancake, flip and cook until the pancake can be lifted without resistance.

6. Lightly oil pan or griddle and repeat the process until all the pancakes are made.

NOTES:

The warmer the ingredients, the more tender the pancakes and the higher they will rise.

Rest the cooked pancakes on a wire rack so that it does not sweat while sitting.

Keep pancakes warm in a 120 degrees F. oven.

If using a 1/2 cup measure, you will get 8 pancakes; if using a 1/3 cup measure, you will get 10 pancakes.

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